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Kids Health Checker

Childhood is an incredibly important time in a person’s development, with the seeds of many future health problems being planted at an early age. This tool will ask you up to 33 multiple choice questions about your child’s health and lifestyle.

For each question select the answer that is most applicable to your child. You will then receive a comprehensive risk report on 13 of the most common health problems that might affect your child in later life, along with some advice on how to make positive changes.

The risk level you receive is only an indication based on your answers and this is not a medical diagnosis tool. If you have any concerns you should always speak to your GP or NHS Direct

Start
1
What gender is your child?
How old is your child? (format: dd/mm/yyyy)
/ /
What is your child's height?
m ft in
What is your child's weight?
kg lbs
What is your child's ethnicity?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Have your child's parents, grandparents or siblings had any of the following conditions?
Does your child already have any of these existing conditions?
Does your child already have any of these existing conditions?
Does your child already have any of these existing conditions?
Is your child living somewhere where one or more adults smoke?
Does your household have any furry or feathered pets?
How often do your child's bed sheets and soft toys get washed?
How would you describe the general cleanliness of your child's home?
How often does your child remember to wash their hands after going to the loo, stroking animals or playing with something dirty?
How often do your child's teeth get brushed?
When your child goes out in the sun, which of the following are you most likely to do?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
How often does your child have the following foods and drinks?
What are your family eating habits like?
At school, how active is your child?
At home, how active is your child?

Below is the personal risk report for 13 of the most common health problems that can affect children in later life. The first thing to say is – don’t panic! If your child’s risk levels are higher then there are often simple steps you can take to lower these and improve their general health and well-being.

If you want to find out which answers contributed to your child’s level of risk, then just click the

Your family doctor or health visitor will be able to advise you on practical steps that can be taken if you have any concerns about your child. There is also advice from the NHS on the Live Well section of the NHS Choices website.

The risk levels your child receives are only an indication based on the answers you have given. There are many other factors that can influence their chances of developing one of these conditions, so please contact your GP with any concerns.

Low risk Medium risk High risk

Obesity

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Obesity

Your answers suggest that your child's risk of becoming obese is low. This is probably due them eating a healthy diet and being physically active. It is important to maintain this type of lifestyle both in childhood and as an adult to continue to prevent obesity, especially as it is a major contributing factor to serious conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

Obesity is mostly caused by a poor diet rich in saturated fats and processed foods, especially when combined a lack of physical activity. Being as active as possible and eating as much fruit, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates (like wholemeal bread or brown rice) is the best way to prevent this. While there are medical conditions that can lead to childhood obesity, these are rare. If your child gains weight suddenly without any major change in their diet or lifestyle, it is important to seek medical advice from their GP.

  • Approximately half of all overweight children remain overweight as adults, so it is important not to assume a child simply has 'puppy fat'.
  • Bad habits can be learned so it is very important for to parents to set a good example in terms of diet and lifestyle to help prevent childhood obesity.
  • Over the last 20 years, the number of overweight children in the UK has tripled.
  • Over 10% of British six-year-olds are obese.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Heart Disease

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Heart disease

Your answers suggest that, at present, your child is at a low risk of heart disease later in life. This is probably because they are already pretty active and are eating a sensible and well-balanced diet. It is important to maintain these good habits in order to keep their risk level low into adulthood.

Heart disease stems from high cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood which, in reasonable quantities, helps the body to make cells, aids digestion and produces hormones. However, large quantities of 'bad' LDL cholesterol can cause a build-up in the arteries and a restriction in the blood supply, causing chest pains and weakening the heart. This can lead to heart failure or, if an artery becomes completely blocked, a heart attack or stroke. LDL Cholesterol can be found in junk food, processed food and fried food so it is better to avoid these in favour of fruits, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates.

  • Every year, around 300,000 UK residents have a heart attack.
  • One quarter of all men and one sixth of UK women die from heart disease. This is more than any other cause of death.
  • Exercise actually improves the level of 'good' HDL cholesterol in the blood, which in turn keeps the level of 'bad' LDL cholesterol down.
  • Two out of three adults in the UK have cholesterol levels at or above Government's recommended maximum.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
High Blood Pressure

Your child has a low risk of having or developing High blood pressure

Your answers indicate that, at the moment, your child is at a low risk of developing high blood pressure. This is probably because they eat well and get sufficient exercise but, as these are factors that can easily change, it is important for you to encourage your child to continue these good habits into their adult lives.

High blood pressure is when the force of blood flow through the arteries is abnormally high. When this happens for a long period of time, it can cause weakening of the heart or damage to the walls of the arteries. Whilst high blood pressure can be due to family history or ethnicity, making sure your child maintains a healthy weight and eats a balanced diet will also help keep the risk of high blood pressure down.

  • People of African-Caribbean and South Asian descent are more likely to develop high blood pressure.
  • 30-40% of UK adults have blood pressure that is too high.
  • 95% of cases of high blood pressure are the result of lifestyle risk factors, not underlying conditions.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Asthma

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Asthma

From your answers, it seems that your child has a low risk of developing asthma. Asthma causes the bronchi (airways), of the lungs to become swollen, making it hard to breathe or causing coughing and wheezing fits. It's not entirely clear what causes asthma, but it's suspected that it is a combination of genetics and environmental factors such as dust, pollen or animal fur. Passive smoking is also a major factor and preventing your child's exposure to second hand smoke will significantly help to prevent or manage their asthma.

Obesity can also be a factor so it is important to encourage a healthy diet and an active lifestyle to help reduce risks further. There is also evidence breastfed children are less at risk.

  • While about three-quarters of children with asthma grow out of it as teenagers, it may come back later in life if they had a moderate to severe condition.
  • One out of ten UK children have some form of asthma.
  • While one in seven children will have instances of wheezing before age five, only half will have asthma.
  • Asthma cannot be cured, but it can usually be successfully managed through various treatments.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Eczema

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Eczema

From your answers, it appears your child is at a low risk of developing eczema.

Eczema is a predominantly genetic condition that causes the skin to become inflamed, dry, cracked and itchy. As it is inheritable, children can be born with the tendency to have it. However, as the condition can also be triggered or heightened by environmental factors such as dust, pollen and animal fur, it is important to minimise these risks by keeping your child's environment as clean as possible. Passive smoking is also a major trigger so it is vital to minimise your child's exposure to second-hand smoke if you want to keep the chances of developing eczema low.

  • Atopic eczema occurs in 60% of children who have a parent with eczema, and 80% of children who have both parents with eczema.
  • 80% of cases of eczema appear in children before age five.
  • By age 16, 65% of cases of childhood eczema will have cleared up.
  • The number of people with eczema is increasing. It is estimated that between 15-20% of children have eczema.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Diabetes

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Diabetes (type 2)

It appears that your child has a low risk of type 2 diabetes. This is probably because they already eat sensibly and stay active, keeping their weight down. Helping your child stay at a healthy weight helps maintain a low risk of type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes causes resistance to the hormone insulin or produces insufficient amounts for the body to function properly. Insulin is required to break down blood sugar so that cells can get energy from it. If this cannot happen properly, blood sugar accumulates which can lead to serious medical problems. While most cases of type 2 diabetes occur in adults, childhood obesity can lead to weight problems in adulthood, directly raising the risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, although rare, more and more children are being diagnosed with the condition each year.

  • 90 to 95% of people who have diabetes have type 2.
  • In the UK, people of African-Caribbean or South Asian descent are five times more likely to acquire type 2 diabetes.
  • Children as young as seven have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
  • 80% of people who develop type 2 diabetes are obese
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Skin Cancer

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Skin cancer

It seems that your child has a low risk of skin cancer, probably due to the positive steps you are taking to protect them from potentially damaging sun exposure. It is important to maintain these steps and also teach your child why they are important as just one or two cases of childhood sunburn may lead to problems later on.

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in Britain. However treatment success rates are high and the chance of skin cancer spreading to other parts of the body is relatively low. Using high factor sun cream, making sure your child is covered up in the sun and discouraging the use of tanning beds are all great ways to minimise risk. Remember, however, regular sunlight is good for the body as it stimulates the production of vitamin D, essential for healthy bone growth. The key to your child's safety here is to be sensible in the sun.

  • There are about 100,000 new cases of skin cancer diagnosed every year.
  • Britain has more deaths from skin cancer than Australia.
  • There are two main types of skin cancer - Basal cell carcinoma can be completely cured in 90% of people whilst in squamous cell carcinoma that number is only slightly lower at around 70-90%
  • Getting sunburned just once or twice before the age of 20 doubles the risk of skin cancer when older.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Lung Cancer

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Lung cancer

Whilst your child's risk of lung cancer is currently low, it is important to ensure that this risk doesn't rise in the future. Cigarette smoke is the biggest risk factor for lung cancer ,so it is crucial to both educate your child about the dangers of smoking and to minimise their exposure to other people's second-hand smoke.

As with other types of cancer, diet and exercise are crucial elements. Avoiding excessive levels of saturated fats, processed foods and red meats are important and fruit, vegetables and wholegrain, foods should be an essential part of your child's diet. Regular exercise can help too by keeping your child's weight down to healthy levels.

  • Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in Britain with 38,000 cases diagnosed each year and is the most common cause of cancer-related death.
  • Smoking accounts for 85-90% of lung cancer cases. Someone who smokes twenty cigarettes a day is twenty times more likely to develop lung cancer than a non smoker.
  • As soon as you stop smoking, your risk of lung cancer starts to go down. Fifteen years after you've stopped smoking, your lung cancer risk is almost the same as that of a non-smoker.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Other Cancer

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Cancer

Your answers suggest that your child currently has a low risk of developing cancer. To keep this risk low it is important to encourage them to stay active and to eat healthily as obesity and poor lifestyle choices in childhood can heighten the risk of cancer later on.

There are several factors that may increase cancer risk levels. Whilst a generally poor diet will increase your chances of getting most cancers, certain foods carry extra risks for different conditions. Excessive amounts of salty or pickled foods, for instance, may leave you vulnerable to mouth or throat cancer whilst too much red meat or processed meat may raise the risk of stomach, bowel and prostate cancers.

Diet aside, cigarette smoke can be a major factor in terms of developing cancer and children growing up in households where they are exposed to second hand smoke may be at greater risk. Also, ethnicity and family history can play significant roles in cancer risk. Those of African or Caribbean descent, for instance, are more susceptible to prostate cancer. On the hereditary front, if you have one close relative with bowel cancer your risk is doubled, if you have two it is increased fourth fold.

  • About 45,000 cases of breast cancer, 8200 cases of stomach cancer, 31,000 cases of bowel cancer, 2,700 cases of oral/mouth cancer and 30,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year.
  • In 2007 there were 127,800 deaths from cancer.
  • Cancer is responsible for the deaths of 25% of women and 30% of men.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Dental Problems

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Dental problems (tooth decay / gingivitis)

It seems that your child is has a low risk of having dental problems, probably due to positive dietary factors and good oral hygiene. Inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) and tooth decay are both very common conditions and very easy to acquire, so it is important to keep your child's risk low. This can be done through continuing good dental habits, like regular brushing and flossing, visiting the dentist and eating a balanced diet that limits sugar and carbohydrates.

  • It's estimated that between half and three-quarters of UK children have some form of obvious tooth decay.
  • Between 50-90% of the adult population experience gingivitis.
  • Dental problems like gingivitis and tooth decay occur when there is a build-up of plaque bacteria that break down sugars in your mouth.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Threadworm

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Threadworm / ringworm

Your answers indicate that your child is at low risk of developing hygiene-related problems such as threadworm (a parasite) and ringworm (a fungus). These conditions are spread through poor hygiene, through children sharing clothing or by scratching inflamed or infected areas.

To help keep your child's risk low, make sure that they always wash hands and keep them from sucking on their fingers. Also, keep good hygiene standards in the home by washing clothing, bedclothes and cooking utensils regularly.

  • Estimates show that up to 40% of UK children under ten may have threadworms at any given time.
  • Threadworm is the most common infestation in the UK.
  • Children living in urban areas and particularly children of African-Caribbean descent are particularly at risk for acquiring scalp ringworm.
  • Ringworm spores can be found in many different places, including in dirt, on animals and in household dust.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Osteoporosis

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Osteoporosis

Your child seems to have a low risk of developing osteoporosis. However, as the condition can be affected by diet and exercise, it is import to help them develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Mainly a condition that develops in old age, osteoporosis causes the body to become less able to break down, renew and replace bone cells, weakening the bones and making them more likely to fracture.

There are several factors that increase the chances of developing osteoporosis. Women tend to be more at risk than men and being underweight can also heighten the risk factor. A diet high in calcium and vitamin D will reduce the risk so drinking milk can help, as will moderate exposure to sunlight (a key element in Vitamin D production – though be careful not to let your child get sunburn). Physical activity can also be a positive factor. People who exercise when they are young and remain active into later life are far less susceptible to osteoporosis.

  • There are around 3 million people with osteoporosis in the UK experiencing up to 230,000 fractures a year between them.
  • Osteoporosis affects about 20% of women aged 60-69.
  • Of the 60,000 people who suffer osteoporotic hip fractures each year, 15-20% will die within 12 months from causes related to the fracture.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Ear, nose and throat infections

It seems that your child may have a reduced risk of developing ear nose and throat infections. Whilst they will probably still pick up the odd bug or two, continuing with their healthy lifestyle habits should ensure that the sniffs and snivels few and far between.

Ear, nose and throat infections are unavoidable part of life for most children but their chances of getting them can be significantly raised by avoidable lifestyle and environmental factors. Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these conditions as can a poor diet or a lack of exercise. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and avoiding unhealthy foods can play a big part in preventing or lessening the effects of ear, nose and throat conditions.

  • Children of smokers are more at risk of glue ear, and will take longer to recover. Repeated infections could lead to speech or behavioural problems.
  • It's normal for young children to get recurring colds – over their first few years they should gradually build up some immunity.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Chest Infection

Your child has a low risk of having or developing Chest infections (and complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia)

It appears that your child has a low risk of getting chest infections. However, no one is immune, so it's important to continue to take proactive steps to keep their risk levels low. This is especially important as chest infections can lead to more severe conditions such as acute bronchitis and pneumonia.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and diet can reduce your child's risk of chest infections, as can encouraging good hygiene to prevent the spread of germs (including keeping household surfaces clean and encouraging your child to regularly wash their hands). The NHS also offers the pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine to young children as a measure of protecting against serious infections.

Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these kinds of conditions so it is important to bring your children up in a smoke-free environment and to educate them on the dangers of smoking.

A chest infection is an infection of the airways leading down to the lungs, or of the lungs themselves. Sufferers usually have a phlegmy cough and, as infections can be easily spread, it is important to cover the mouth when coughing or sneezing and to use disposable tissues.

  • 4.5% of the population contract Bronchitis per year – almost 3 million people.
  • In the UK, pneumonia affects up to 11 in 1,000 adults each year. It's more common during autumn and winter.
  • 99% of people treated for pneumonia outside of hospital make a full recovery.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Obesity

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Obesity

From the information you have provided, it seems your child has a medium risk of becoming obese. Because of this risk, it is important that you help your child develop and maintain healthy lifestyle choices, including making sure they have plenty of physical activity in their free time, as well as eating well-balanced meals and limiting snacks.

Obesity is caused by a poor diet rich in saturated fats and processed foods, especially when combined a lack of physical activity. Being more active and eating more fruits, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates (like wholemeal bread or brown rice) is the best way to prevent this. While there are medical conditions that can lead to childhood obesity, these are rare. If your child gains weight suddenly without any major change in their diet or lifestyle, it is important to seek medical advice from their GP.

  • Approximately half of all overweight children remain overweight as adults, so it is important not to assume a child simply has 'puppy fat'.
  • Bad habits can be learned so it is very important for to parents to set a good example in terms of diet and lifestyle to help prevent childhood obesity.
  • Over the last 20 years, the number of overweight children in the UK has tripled.
  • Over 10% of British six-year-olds are obese.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Heart Disease

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Heart disease

Your answers indicate your child may be at a medium risk of developing heart disease as an adult. It is important to lower this risk, as coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the UK. While some risk factors, such as family history, are unpreventable, others are avoidable. You can lower your child's risk factors by making sure they eat well-balanced meals, get plenty of exercise and avoid second-hand smoke.

Heart disease stems from high cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood that, in reasonable quantities, helps the body to make cells, aids digestion and produces hormones. However, large quantities of 'bad' LDL cholesterol can cause a build-up in the arteries and a restriction in the blood supply, causing chest pains and weakening the heart. This can lead to heart failure or, if an artery becomes completely blocked, a heart attack or stroke. LDL Cholesterol can be found in junk food, processed food and fried food so it is better to avoid these in favour of fruits, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates.

  • Every year, around 300,000 UK residents have a heart attack.
  • One quarter of all men and one sixth of UK women die from heart disease. This is more than any other cause of death.
  • Exercise actually improves the level of 'good' HDL cholesterol in the blood, which in turn keeps the level of 'bad' LDL cholesterol down.
  • Two out of three adults in the UK have cholesterol levels at or above Government's recommended maximum.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
High Blood Pressure

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing High blood pressure

Your answers suggest your child has a medium risk of developing high blood pressure later in life. As risk factors can be both genetic and lifestyle related, it is important for you to ensure your child eats well and stays active to offset the risks you cannot control.

High blood pressure is when the force of blood flow through the arteries is abnormally high. When this happens for a long period of time, it can cause weakening of the heart or damage to the walls of the arteries. Whilst high blood pressure can be due to family history or ethnicity, making sure your child maintains a healthy weight and eats a balanced diet will also help keep the risk of high blood pressure down.

  • People of African-Caribbean and South Asian descent are more likely to develop high blood pressure.
  • 30-40% of UK adults have blood pressure that is too high.
  • 95% of cases of high blood pressure are the result of lifestyle risk factors, not underlying conditions.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Asthma

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Asthma

It appears that your child has a medium risk of developing asthma. This could be due to both genetic and environmental factors so it is important to address the things you can control to lessen the impact of those you can't.

Asthma causes the bronchi (airways), of the lungs to become swollen, making it hard to breathe or causing coughing and wheezing fits. It's not entirely clear what causes asthma, but it's suspected that it is a combination of genetics and environmental factors such as dust, pollen or animal fur. Passive smoking is also a major factor and preventing your child's exposure to second hand smoke will significantly help to prevent or manage their asthma.

Obesity can also be a factor so it is important to encourage a healthy diet and an active lifestyle to help reduce risks further. There is also evidence breastfed children are less at risk.

  • While about three-quarters of children with asthma grow out of it as teenagers, it may come back later in life if they had a moderate to severe condition.
  • One out of ten UK children have some form of asthma.
  • While one in seven children will have instances of wheezing before age five, only half will have asthma.
  • Asthma cannot be cured, but it can usually be successfully managed through various treatments.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Eczema

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Eczema

Your answers indicate that your child is at medium risk of developing eczema.

Eczema is an incurable and predominantly genetic condition that causes the skin to become inflamed, dry, cracked and itchy. As it is inheritable, children can be born with an increased risk of developing it.

However, as the condition can also be triggered or heightened by environmental factors such as dust, pollen and animal fur, it is important to minimise these risks by keeping your child's environment as clean as possible. Passive smoking is also a major trigger so it is vital to minimise your child's exposure to second-hand smoke if you want to reduce the risk or severity of the condition. Also, make sure your child's skin stays clean and well-moisturized, particularly if they do develop eczema, to prevent possible infection.

  • Atopic eczema occurs in 60% of children who have a parent with eczema, and 80% of children who have both parents with eczema.
  • 80% of cases of eczema appear in children before age five.
  • By age 16, 65% of cases of childhood eczema will have cleared up.
  • The number of people with eczema is increasing. It is estimated that between 15-20% of children have eczema.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Diabetes

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Diabetes (type 2)

From your answers, it seems that your child has a medium risk of developing type 2 diabetes. While ethnicity and family history are significant factors for developing the condition, obesity poses the biggest risk. If your child falls within vulnerable groups because of genetic factors you can't change, it is even more important for you to address the risks that are under your control by improving their diet and increasing their activity in order to combat obesity.

Type 2 diabetes causes resistance to the hormone insulin or produces insufficient amounts for the body to function properly. Insulin is required to break down blood sugar so that cells can get energy from it. If this cannot happen properly, blood sugar accumulates which can lead to serious medical problems. While most cases of type 2 diabetes occur in adults, childhood obesity can lead to weight problems in adulthood, directly raising the risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, although rare, more and more children are being diagnosed with the condition each year.

  • 90 to 95% of people who have diabetes have type 2.
  • In the UK, people of African-Caribbean or South Asian descent are five times more likely to acquire type 2 diabetes.
  • Children as young as seven have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
  • 80% of people who develop type 2 diabetes are obese.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Skin Cancer

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Skin cancer

It seems that your child has a medium risk of developing skin cancer. It is important to take positive steps to reduce this risk by protecting them from potentially damaging sun exposure. It is also crucial to teach your child why sun protection is important so they can keep up these positive habits into adult life. Remember, just one or two cases of sunburn in childhood may lead to serious problems later on.

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in Britain. However treatment success rates are high and the chance of skin cancer spreading to other parts of the body is relatively low. Using high factor sun cream, making sure your child is covered up in the sun and discouraging the use of tanning beds are all great ways to minimise risk. Remember, however, regular sunlight is good for the body as it stimulates the production of vitamin D, essential for healthy bone growth. The key to your child's safety here is to be sensible in the sun.

  • There are about 100,000 new cases of skin cancer diagnosed every year.
  • Britain has more deaths from skin cancer than Australia.
  • There are two main types of skin cancer - Basal cell carcinoma can be completely cured in 90% of people whilst in squamous cell carcinoma that number is only slightly lower at around 70-90%.
  • Getting sunburned just once or twice before the age of 20 doubles the risk of skin cancer when older.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Lung Cancer

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Lung cancer

Your child has a medium risk of developing lung cancer so it is really important to takes steps to reduce this and to ensure that it doesn't increase any further.

Cigarette smoke is perhaps the biggest risk factor for lung cancer, so it is crucial to both educate your child about the dangers of smoking and to minimise their exposure to other people's second-hand smoke. If you are a smoker yourself and you smoke around your child, it may be worth trying to quit, both to reduce the dangers of passive smoking and to set a good example.

As with other types of cancer, diet and exercise are crucial elements. Avoiding excessive levels of saturated fats, processed foods and red meats are important and fruit, vegetables and wholegrain, foods should be an essential part of your child's diet. Regular exercise can help too by keeping your child's weight down to healthy levels.

  • Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in Britain with 38,000 cases diagnosed each year and is the most common cause of cancer-related death.
  • Smoking accounts for 85-90% of lung cancer cases. Someone who smokes twenty cigarettes a day is twenty times more likely to develop lung cancer than a non smoker.
  • As soon as you stop smoking, your risk of lung cancer starts to go down. Fifteen years after you've stopped smoking, your lung cancer risk is almost the same as that of a non-smoker.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Other Cancer

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Cancer

Your child may have a medium risk of developing cancer but there are steps you can take to reduce this risk. Encouraging them to eat a healthy diet whilst having an active lifestyle should help, as will reducing their exposure to cigarette smoke.

There are several factors that may increase cancer risk levels. Whilst a generally poor diet will increase your chances of getting most cancers, certain foods carry extra risks for different conditions. Excessive amounts of salty or pickled foods, for instance, may leave you vulnerable to mouth or throat cancer whilst too much red meat or processed meat may raise the risk of stomach, bowel and prostate cancers.

Diet aside, cigarette smoke can be a major factor in terms of developing cancer and children growing up in households where they are exposed to second hand smoke may be at greater risk. Also, ethnicity and family history can play significant roles in cancer risk. Those of African or Caribbean descent, for instance, are more susceptible to prostate cancer. On the hereditary front, if you have one close relative with bowel cancer your risk is doubled, if you have two it is increased fourth fold.

  • About 45,000 cases of breast cancer, 8200 cases of stomach cancer, 31,000 cases of bowel cancer, 2,700 cases of oral/mouth cancer and 30,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year.
  • In 2007 there were 127,800 deaths from cancer.
  • Cancer is responsible for the deaths of 25% of women and 30% of men.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Dental Problems

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Dental problems (tooth decay / gingivitis)

It appears your child is at a medium risk of having dental problems. Tooth decay and inflamed gums (gingivitis) are not only unsightly but also cause pain and infection. Younger children are particularly at risk, as the enamel of their teeth is not fully developed.

To minimise your child's risk of developing dental problems, it is important to make sure they maintain a healthy diet that is low in sugars, especially avoiding too many sweets, chocolates, processed foods and fizzy drinks. Also, establishing dental care habits such as brushing twice a day and regularly visiting a dentist will help to prevent dental problems and will encourage your child to keep up good oral hygiene habits into adulthood.

  • It's estimated that between half and three-quarters of UK children have some form of obvious tooth decay.
  • Between 50-90% of the adult population experience gingivitis.
  • Dental problems like gingivitis and tooth decay occur when there is a build-up of plaque bacteria that break down sugars in your mouth.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Threadworm

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Threadworm / ringworm

Your answers indicate that your child has a medium risk of developing hygiene-related problems such as threadworm (a parasite) and ringworm (a fungus). These conditions are spread through poor hygiene, through children sharing clothing or by scratching inflamed or infected areas.

To help reduce your child's risk, make sure that they always wash hands and keep them from sucking on their fingers. Also, keep good hygiene standards in the home by washing clothing, bedclothes and cooking utensils regularly.

Even if one member of your family is affected by threadworms, it may be necessary for the whole household to undergo treatment and implement a strict hygiene regime in order to prevent re-infection. Talk to your GP about what steps should be taken.

  • Estimates show that up to 40% of UK children under ten may have threadworms at any given time.
  • Threadworm is the most common infestation in the UK.
  • Children living in urban areas and particularly children of African-Caribbean descent are particularly at risk for acquiring scalp ringworm.
  • Ringworm spores can be found in many different places, including in dirt, on animals and in household dust.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Osteoporosis

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Osteoporosis

It seems that your child may have a medium risk of developing osteoporosis. This could be due to genetic factors but may also be because they are underweight, not physically active enough or not getting essential vitamins in their diet.

Mainly a condition that develops in old age, osteoporosis causes the body to become less able to break down, renew and replace bone cells, weakening the bones and making them more likely to fracture.

There are several factors that increase the chances of developing osteoporosis. Women tend to be more at risk than men and being underweight can also heighten the risk factor. A diet high in calcium and vitamin D will reduce the risk so drinking milk can help, as will moderate exposure to sunlight (a key element in Vitamin D production ¬- though be careful not to let your child get sunburn). Physical activity can also be a positive factor. People who exercise when they are young and remain active into later life are far less susceptible to osteoporosis.

  • There are around 3 million people with osteoporosis in the UK experiencing up to 230,000 fractures a year between them.
  • Osteoporosis affects about 20% of women aged 60-69.
  • Of the 60,000 people who suffer osteoporotic hip fractures each year, 15-20% will die within 12 months from causes related to the fracture.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Ear, nose and throat infections

It seems that your child may have a medium risk of developing ear nose and throat infections. Whilst all kids will probably pick up the odd bug or two, those who have poor lifestyle habits may be more susceptible to illness or may suffer more when they fall ill. Poor hygiene can also contribute so keep their environment clean and encourage your kids to use tissues and to wash their hands regularly to avoid the spread of germs.

Ear, nose and throat infections are an unavoidable part of life for most children but their chances of getting them can be significantly raised by avoidable lifestyle and environmental factors. Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these conditions as can a poor diet or a lack of exercise. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and avoiding unhealthy foods can play a big part in preventing or lessening the effects of ear, nose and throat conditions.

  • Children of smokers are more at risk of glue ear, and will take longer to recover. Repeated infections could lead to speech or behavioural problems.
  • It's normal for young children to get recurring colds – over their first few years they should gradually build up some immunity.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Chest Infection

Your child has a medium risk of having or developing Chest infections (and complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia)

It appears that your child has a medium of getting chest infections. Chest infections can lead to more severe conditions such as acute bronchitis and pneumonia so it's important to take proactive steps to reduce your child's risk levels.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and diet can reduce your child's risk of chest infections, as can encouraging good hygiene to prevent the spread of germs (including keeping household surfaces clean and encouraging your child to regularly wash their hands). The NHS also offers the pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine to young children as a measure of protecting against serious infections.

Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these kinds of conditions so it is important to bring your children up in a smoke-free environment and to educate them on the dangers of smoking.

A chest infection is an infection of the airways leading down to the lungs, or of the lungs themselves. Sufferers usually have a phlegmy cough and, as infections can be easily spread, it is important to cover the mouth when coughing or sneezing and to use disposable tissues.

  • 4.5% of the population contract Bronchitis per year – almost 3 million people.
  • In the UK, pneumonia affects up to 11 in 1,000 adults each year. It's more common during autumn and winter.
  • 99% of people treated for pneumonia outside of hospital make a full recovery.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Obesity

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Obesity

Your answers indicate that your child has a high risk of becoming obese (or may be obese already). This is probably due to lifestyle and dietary factors. Obesity can lead to an increased risk of serious health problems both as a child and in adulthood and can also have a negative impact on their self-esteem. Although it is clearly vital to change your child's lifestyle habits, crash dieting is not advisable for overweight children as this can lead to additional health problems. Instead, it is better for them to shift to healthier eating habits and to take up more physical activities.

Obesity is caused by a poor diet rich in saturated fats and processed foods, especially when combined a lack of physical activity. Being more active and eating more fruits, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates (like wholemeal bread or brown rice) is the best way to prevent this. While there are medical conditions that can lead to childhood obesity, these are rare. If your child gains weight suddenly without any major change in their diet or lifestyle, it is important to seek medical advice from their GP.

  • Approximately half of all overweight children remain overweight as adults, so it is important not to assume a child simply has 'puppy fat'.
  • Bad habits can be learned so it is very important for to parents to set a good example in terms of diet and lifestyle to help prevent childhood obesity.
  • Over the last 20 years, the number of overweight children in the UK has tripled.
  • Over 10% of British six-year-olds are obese.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Heart Disease

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Heart disease

Your answers suggest that your child may have a high-risk of developing heart disease in adulthood. This could be due to pre-existing conditions or a family history of illness but it is most likely due to a generally unhealthy lifestyle. Since heart disease is the number one cause of death in the UK, it is crucial to lower your child's risk early. You can do this by giving them a healthy diet, encouraging more exercise and by reducing their exposure to second-hand smoke.

Heart disease stems from high cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood that, in reasonable quantities, helps the body to make cells, aids digestion and produces hormones (amongst other things). However, large quantities of 'bad' LDL cholesterol can cause a build-up in the arteries and a restriction in the blood supply, causing chest pains and weakening the heart. This can lead to heart failure or, if an artery becomes completely blocked, a heart attack or stroke. LDL Cholesterol can be found in junk food, processed food and fried food so it is better to avoid these in favour of fruits, vegetables and unrefined carbohydrates.

  • Every year, around 300,000 UK residents have a heart attack.
  • One quarter of all men and one sixth of UK women die from heart disease. This is more than any other cause of death.
  • Exercise actually improves the level of 'good' HDL cholesterol in the blood, which in turn keeps the level of 'bad' LDL cholesterol down.
  • Two out of three adults in the UK have cholesterol levels at or above Government's recommended maximum.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
High Blood Pressure

Your child has a high risk of having or developing High blood pressure

Your answers show that your child has a high risk of developing high blood pressure as an adult, that in turn, may lead to more serious conditions such as heart disease, heart attacks or strokes. Diet and weight are major factors in developing high blood pressure so if your child is obese or eats

High blood pressure is when the force of blood flow through the arteries is abnormally high. When this happens for a long period of time, it can cause weakening of the heart or damage to the walls of the arteries. While sometimes high blood pressure can be due to family history or ethnicity, making sure your child maintains a healthy weight and eats a balanced diet will also help keep the risk of high blood pressure down.

  • People of African-Caribbean and South Asian descent are more likely to develop high blood pressure.
  • 30-40% of UK adults have blood pressure that is too high.
  • 95% of cases of high blood pressure are the result of lifestyle risk factors, not underlying conditions.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Asthma

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Asthma

Your answers indicate that your child may have a high risk of developing asthma. This could be due to both genetic and environmental factors so it is important to address the things you can control to lessen the impact of those you can't.

Asthma causes the bronchi (airways), of the lungs to become swollen, making it hard to breathe or causing coughing and wheezing fits. It's not entirely clear what causes asthma, but it's suspected that it is a combination of genetics and environmental factors such as dust, pollen or animal fur. Passive smoking is also a major factor and preventing your child's exposure to second hand smoke will significantly help to prevent or manage their asthma.

Obesity can also be a factor so it is important to encourage a healthy diet and an active lifestyle to help reduce risks further. There is also evidence breastfed children are less at risk.

  • While about three-quarters of children with asthma grow out of it as teenagers, it may come back later in life if they had a moderate to severe condition.
  • One out of ten UK children have some form of asthma.
  • While one in seven children will have instances of wheezing before age five, only half will have asthma.
  • Asthma cannot be cured, but it can usually be successfully managed through various treatments.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Eczema

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Eczema

Your child may have a high risk of developing eczema. Eczema is an incurable and predominantly genetic condition that causes the skin to become inflamed, dry, cracked and itchy. As it is inheritable, children can be born with an increased risk of developing it.

However, as the condition can also be triggered or heightened by environmental factors such as dust, pollen and animal fur, it is important to minimise these risks by keeping your child's environment as clean as possible. Passive smoking is also a major trigger so it is vital to minimise your child's exposure to second-hand smoke if you want to reduce the risk or severity of the condition. Also, make sure your child's skin stays clean and well-moisturized, particularly if they do develop eczema, to prevent possible infection.

  • Atopic eczema occurs in 60% of children who have a parent with eczema, and 80% of children who have both parents with eczema.
  • 80% of cases of eczema appear in children before age five.
  • By age 16, 65% of cases of childhood eczema will have cleared up.
  • The number of people with eczema is increasing. It is estimated that between 15-20% of children have eczema.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Diabetes

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Diabetes (type 2)

From your answers, it seems that your child may have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes While ethnicity and family history are significant factors for developing the condition, obesity poses the biggest risk. If your child falls within vulnerable groups because of genetic factors you can't change, it is even more important for you to address the risks that are under your control by improving their diet and increasing their activity in order to combat obesity.

Type 2 diabetes causes resistance to the hormone insulin or produces insufficient amounts for the body to function properly. Insulin is required to break down blood sugar so that cells can get energy from it. If this cannot happen properly, blood sugar accumulates which can lead to serious medical problems. While most cases of type 2 diabetes occur in adults, childhood obesity can lead to weight problems in adulthood, directly raising the risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, although rare, more and more children are being diagnosed with the condition each year.

  • 90 to 95% of people who have diabetes have type 2.
  • In the UK, people of African-Caribbean or South Asian descent are five times more likely to acquire type 2 diabetes.
  • Children as young as seven have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
  • 80% of people who develop type 2 diabetes are obese.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Skin Cancer

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Skin cancer

Your child has a high risk of developing skin cancer. It is important to take positive steps to reduce this risk by protecting them from potentially damaging sun exposure. It is also crucial to teach your child why sun protection is important so they can keep up these positive habits into adult life. Remember, just one or two cases of sunburn in childhood may lead to serious problems later on. Should you see any changes in your child's skin, particularly changes to moles consult your GP as soon as possible.

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in Britain. However treatment success rates are high and the chance of skin cancer spreading to other parts of the body is relatively low. Using high factor sun cream, making sure your child is covered up in the sun and discouraging the use of tanning beds are all great ways to minimise risk. Remember, however, regular sunlight is good for the body as it stimulates the production of vitamin D, essential for healthy bone growth. The key to your child's safety here is to be sensible in the sun.

  • There are about 100,000 new cases of skin cancer diagnosed every year.
  • Britain has more deaths from skin cancer than Australia.
  • There are two main types of skin cancer - Basal cell carcinoma can be completely cured in 90% of people whilst in squamous cell carcinoma that number is only slightly lower at around 70-90%.
  • Getting sunburned just once or twice before the age of 20 doubles the risk of skin cancer when older.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Lung Cancer

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Lung cancer

Your child is at high risk of developing lung cancer so it is absolutely crucial to takes steps to reduce this now to increase their chances of a healthy adult life.

Cigarette smoke is perhaps the biggest risk factor for lung cancer, so it is essential to both educate your child about the dangers of smoking and to minimise their exposure to other people's second-hand smoke. If you are a smoker yourself and you smoke around your child, it may be worth trying to quit, both to reduce the dangers of passive smoking and to set a good example.

As with other types of cancer, diet and exercise are crucial elements. Avoiding excessive levels of saturated fats, processed foods and red meats are important and fruit, vegetables and wholegrain, foods should be an essential part of your child's diet. Regular exercise can help too by keeping your child's weight down to healthy levels.

  • Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in Britain with 38,000 cases diagnosed each year and is the most common cause of cancer-related death.
  • Smoking accounts for 85-90% of lung cancer cases. Someone who smokes twenty cigarettes a day is twenty times more likely to develop lung cancer than a non smoker.
  • As soon as you stop smoking, your risk of lung cancer starts to go down. Fifteen years after you’ve stopped smoking, your lung cancer risk is almost the same as that of a non-smoker.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Other Cancer

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Cancer

Your results suggest your child may have a high risk of developing cancer, but there are steps you can take to reduce this risk. Encouraging them to eat a healthy diet whilst having an active lifestyle should help, as will reducing their exposure to cigarette smoke.

There are several factors that may increase cancer risk levels. Whilst a generally poor diet will increase your chances of getting most cancers, certain foods carry extra risks for different conditions. Excessive amounts of salty or pickled foods, for instance, may leave you vulnerable to mouth or throat cancer whilst too much red meat or processed meat may raise the risk of stomach, bowel and prostate cancers.

Diet aside, cigarette smoke can be a major factor in terms of developing cancer and children growing up in households where they are exposed to second hand smoke may be at greater risk. Also, ethnicity and family history can play significant roles in cancer risk. Those of African or Caribbean descent, for instance, are more susceptible to prostate cancer. On the hereditary front, if you have one close relative with bowel cancer your risk is doubled, if you have two it is increased fourth fold.

  • About 45,000 cases of breast cancer, 8200 cases of stomach cancer, 31,000 cases of bowel cancer, 2,700 cases of oral/mouth cancer and 30,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year.
  • In 2007 there were 127,800 deaths from cancer.
  • Cancer is responsible for the deaths of 25% of women and 30% of men.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Dental Problems

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Dental problems (tooth decay / gingivitis)

Your answers suggest that your child is at high risk of having or developing dental problems, such as gingivitis (inflamed gums) or tooth decay.

These problems are not only unsightly, but also cause pain and infection. If left untreated, they can progress into serious conditions that harm the mouth for life. It's important to help your child care for their teeth from a young age, as even problems with milk teeth can lead to later difficulties with adult teeth.

It is vital to help lower your child's risk of tooth problems by encouraging good dental habits. These include eating a diet that is low in sugars (particularly those found in sweets, chocolates, processed foods and fizzy drinks), brushing teeth twice daily and going on regular dentist visits.

  • It's estimated that between half and three-quarters of UK children have some form of obvious tooth decay.
  • Between 50-90% of the adult population experience gingivitis.
  • Dental problems like gingivitis and tooth decay occur when there is a build-up of plaque bacteria that break down sugars in your mouth.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Threadworm

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Threadworm / ringworm

Your answers indicate that your child has a high risk of developing hygiene-related problems such as threadworm (a parasite) and ringworm (a fungus). These conditions are spread through poor hygiene, through children sharing clothing or by scratching inflamed or infected areas.

To help reduce your child's risk, make sure that they always wash hands and keep them from sucking on their fingers. Also, keep good hygiene standards in the home by washing clothing, bedclothes and cooking utensils regularly.

Even if one member of your family is affected by threadworms, it may be necessary for the whole household to undergo treatment and implement a strict hygiene regime in order to prevent re-infection. Talk to your GP about what steps should be taken.

  • Estimates show that up to 40% of UK children under ten may have threadworms at any given time.
  • Threadworm is the most common infestation in the UK.
  • Children living in urban areas and particularly children of African-Caribbean descent are particularly at risk for acquiring scalp ringworm.
  • Ringworm spores can be found in many different places, including in dirt, on animals and in household dust.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Osteoporosis

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Osteoporosis

It seems that your child may have a high risk of developing osteoporosis. This could be due to genetic factors but may also be because they are not eating healthily, are not physically active enough or are not getting essential vitamins in their diet. An underweight child may be particularly at risk so see your GP in are worried or need advice on improving their diet.

Mainly a condition that develops in old age, osteoporosis causes the body to become less able to break down, renew and replace bone cells, weakening the bones and making them more likely to fracture.

There are several factors that increase the chances of developing osteoporosis. Women tend to be more at risk than men and being underweight can also heighten the risk factor. A diet high in calcium and vitamin D will reduce the risk so drinking milk can help, as will moderate exposure to sunlight (a key element in Vitamin D production ¬- though be careful not to let your child get sunburn). Physical activity can also be a positive factor. People who exercise when they are young and remain active into later life are far less susceptible to osteoporosis.

  • There are around 3 million people with osteoporosis in the UK experiencing up to 230,000 fractures a year between them.
  • Osteoporosis affects about 20% of women aged 60-69.
  • Of the 60,000 people who suffer osteoporotic hip fractures each year, 15-20% will die within a 12 months from causes related to the fracture.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Ear, nose and throat infections

Your child may be of higher risk than necessary of developing ear, nose and throat infections. Whilst all kids will probably pick up the odd bug or two, those who have poor lifestyle habits may be more susceptible to illness or may suffer more when they fall ill. Poor hygiene can also contribute so keep their environment clean and encourage your kids to use tissues and to wash their hands regularly to avoid the spread of germs.

Ear, nose and throat infections are an unavoidable part of life for most children but their chances of getting them can be significantly raised by avoidable lifestyle and environmental factors. Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these conditions as can a poor diet or a lack of exercise. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and avoiding unhealthy foods can play a big part in preventing or lessening the effects of ear, nose and throat conditions.

  • Children of smokers are more at risk of glue ear, and will take longer to recover. Repeated infections could lead to speech or behavioural problems.
  • It's normal for young children to get recurring colds – over their first few years they should gradually build up some immunity.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
Chest Infection

Your child has a high risk of having or developing Chest infections (and complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia)

Your child may be at high risk of getting chest infections. Chest infections can lead to more severe conditions such as acute bronchitis and pneumonia so it's important to take proactive steps to reduce your child's risk levels as soon as possible.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and diet can reduce your child's risk of chest infections, as can encouraging good hygiene to prevent the spread of germs (including keeping household surfaces clean and encouraging your child to regularly wash their hands). The NHS also offers the pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine to young children as a measure of protecting against serious infections.

Exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke can be a major trigger for these kinds of conditions so it is important to bring your children up in a smoke-free environment and to educate them on the dangers of smoking.

A chest infection is an infection of the airways leading down to the lungs, or of the lungs themselves. Sufferers usually have a phlegmy cough and, as infections can be easily spread, it is important to cover the mouth when coughing or sneezing and to use disposable tissues.

  • 4.5% of the population contract Bronchitis per year - almost 3 million people.
  • In the UK, pneumonia affects up to 11 in 1,000 adults each year. It's more common during autumn and winter.
  • 99% of people treated for pneumonia outside of hospital make a full recovery.
Show me why my child got this risk level...
  • None of your answers affected your child's risk of having or developing this condition.
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