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2% of Babies in Europe are born with birth defects that will effect their ability to survive or function normally. The most common are missing or extra fingers or toes, abnormalities in positioning – including club foot, and spinal defects such as spina bifida. Diagnosis has been revolutionised since the widespread use of ultrasound in unborn babies, and 50% can be detected before birth. Unfortunately, this was not the case for 10 month old Oscar, whose parents Natalie and Mushtaq suspected their son had dislocation of the hip. 4 in 1000 babies are born with hip dysplasia and 8 out of 10 female. This is normally detected during newborn or 6 week checks, but if you are worried your baby may have the condition, look out for one leg being slightly shorter, extra skin creases on the hip or thigh and one hip not opening as far as the other. Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, Prof. Nick Clarke explains the operation, first muscles and ligaments have to be loosened up to avoid complications. When in surgery, the muscle in the groin is cut, and dye is injected into the joint, this will allow the doctor to see what is obstructing the hip joint. At this point the hip may be moved into place without surgery, however in Oscar’s case, a ligament needs to be removed for the hip to go back into place. After surgery, Oscar spends 18 weeks in plaster to ensure the joint stays in place.

Patient Name: Oscar
Condition: Developmental Dysplasia of the hip
Specialist: Professor Nicholas Clarke, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon
Hospital: Southampton General Hospital, NHS
Length of Treatment: 1 week in traction and approximately 1 hour in surgery.

Please visit Patient UK to find out more about Hip Dysplasia

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I was diagnosed with hip dysphasia at 37 and had two hip replacements 3 years ago. My 9 year old daughter has now developed groin pain and has been diagnosed with hip dysphasia She is constantly in pain and is becoming depressed. Consultant has offered acetabularplasty which i believe is a fairly big invasive procedure and we are going for a 2nd opinion soon. The consultant also said he believed the procedure would be hugely beneficial in elevating the pain and that bryony could go on and lead a normal life without the need for more surgery later. However the testimonials of other hip patients contradict this. I am so unsure of where to go from here but it is killing me seeing my beautiful little girl in pain. Any advise would be greatly appreciated





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My daughter was diagnosed at 2days old with bilateral ddh,she's had pavlik harness, traction, closed and open reductions, a number of spica casts and braces all of which have failed :((( recently she has had a pemberton osteotomy and a salters osteotomy both followed by spica casts, she is cast free now with the last 7wks and walking around the place, all her xrays look good so far, but still our consultant cant guarantee that this will be the end of her treatment!!!!





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My daughter was late in being dianosed at nearly 4 and half months! but was quickly harnessed which was abit of a shock ! she progressed well and was discharged a few years ago.She had one little stay in hospital for an explorative look at her hips but all proved fine. SHe is now 8 and very energetic and mobile.Over the last few months she has been complaining of hip pain in both sides and lots of clicking.Does this mean her DDh is back ????





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Hi, my daughter was diagnosed with hip dysplacia 3 weeks ago at 8 weeks old. Apparently her hip socket is only 20% developed, this is a result of her being breech throughout all of my pregnancy. She is now wearing a pavlick harness 24/7. She doesn't like it all and it's heart breaking to see her in it. We had a follow up scan yesterday after 3 weeks but it showed no improvement. I'm keen to hear if anyone else has experience of the harness and their thoughts on how effective it is? Many thanks





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Hi i have had 2 out of 3 of my daughters treated in the Pavlik and both have been treated successfuly after being in the harness for 13 weeks. what I would say is after a couple of weeks in the harness they knew it was working. The girls settle down after a few weeks in it. but hated the weekly checks at the hospital as they didnt like being messed about in the harness. Hope you have successful treatment.

Hi Emma, My little girl went was diagnosed with DDH at 6 weeks old. Hers was caused by being breech all pregnancy too, and was bilateral (both sides) with neither socket formed and both completely dislocated. She wore a Pavlik for 7 weeks from 6 weeks old and had no improvement. At age 4 months she did 2 weeks in traction (not common here in Australia), and then had a closed reduction. She wore a hip spica for 12 weeks, and then a dbb (type of brace) for a further 18 weeks. She came out of that a week before her birthday. Overall she has been in some form of brace/cast for almost 10 of her first 12 months of life! She is doing really well now, although still cannot crawl, stand or walk, but will get there. I hope that your journey is a smooth one.

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Hi my names kelsey i am 22. Just over a year ago i was diagnosed with hip dysplasia. I started getting hip pain at the age of 15 every time i come on my period then it got worse over the years. Ive been on the sick just over a year now :-( in pain alday everyday and on alot of painkillers including morphine just to get me through the day. I really want to get awareness for people who suffer from hip dysplasia. Ive had so much trouble with doctors but luckly my mum kept fighting for me and now seeing a specialist in london and awainting on a operation called a peri-acetabular osteotomty. So if your suffering with ddh keep fighting!!! Xxx





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Hi Kelsey, My names Lora, I'm 22 and I had my PAO on Feb 9th and waiting my right hip to be operated on (dysplasia in both hips) Have you had your op yet? Any idea when you will have it? Or what hospital/surgeon you will have? Xxx

Hello Kelsey, I am so sorry to read about the pain you are in and the fight your mum has had. My mum also spent many years fighting for me. I can highly recommend Mr Martyn Porter at Wrightington Hip & Knee Hospital. He is a genius - my words :) Mr Porter is a senior orthopaedic figure, he's got great technical skill and has the kindness and empathy to go with it! I only wish I'd found him earlier! In the Daily Mail online 2010 (you can google it) Britain's top surgeons for hip replacements were revealed. He is one of them. It really is worth a second opinion from him if you are unsure. I hope you don't mind me mentioning it, nobody advised me... and in terms of the law and what it states it is too late for me now, but please consider bringing a medical negligence claim. From what you write it sounds like your hip problem has been missed. If that is the case then there is a limited time to start a claim.. You may have a strong case and if you are successful it will help you so much in your future life. JMW Solicitors and Pannone in Manchester are top of their field in medical negligence and hip claims. Try them both :) Don't delay. Good luck. Heidi x x

I had DDH when i was 12 had pins placed in my hips than at the age 13 had them removed. I am 33 yrs old now i have had no problems walking dancing etc. But just a few weeks ago my hips started locking again and been so painful just to walk. Can my DDH come back now as an adult?





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Hello, My daughter was disgnosed with DDH at 14 months, due to her age and stage of development she had to have open reduction surgery and after been in cast for 10 week the had "D" rotation Femoral Osteotomy. 5 weeks later she had her cast removed the 6 weeks later started to walk again. Has a check a few weeks ago had a check and X-Ray and all well, due to go back in November, Pins and plates should be removed in January, with day surgery.





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Things have changed so much for the better. I was born in 1941. I think I may have had my hips dislocated when I was born and it went un-noticed. I could never sit cross legged, turn summersaults or jump vaulting horses, and my gym teachers, some of whom taught academic subjects, made my life hell. I could never ever walk far, but I could cycle 150 miles in a day without any trouble when I was a teenager. I was x-rayed after being knocked off my bike at 16 and diagnosed with the arthrytic hips of a 75 year old. There was nothing to be done then and I soldiered on for 50 years until I ground to a halt. I have now had two total hip replacements and I've thrown away my sticks, I can walk 10 miles and cycle 50.





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my daughter is 3 years old and has mild hip dysplacia,the acetabular index of her left hip is 28 degrees and 24 degrees is normal our specialist wants to intervene but has been given her time to see if she outgrows it.She has no pain and appears normal and we are hesitant in getting it done.they say its best to get done before school age.is there anyone that has a similar situation that can give me their view thanks.





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Hi, I'm only 13 now, and suffered with this for a while. It wasn't noticed, when we spoke to the doctors, several times, until we transfered to a different hospital, where it was imeadiatley noticed. I was in plaster alot after my operation, and had to learn to walk again, but was luckily discharged at the age of 10. Although the doctors failed to notice my condition, and constanly claimed that there was nothing wrong, my family persisted to find out what was truly the matter. My cast was from my armpits to my ankles, stopping me from walking. I still have the scar on my left hip today, and am VERY greatful, that the dislocation of my hip was noticed when it was. this topic being brought up for the show, was amazing, as admitedly, is a fairly rare thing to watch on TV, so thankyou so much for touching on these issues. Chloe.





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